Coca-Cola Volunteers Remove Invasive Species on Angeles National Forest

How do you help fight California’s drought? One way is to replenish local supplies of water. More than 50 Coca-Cola employees helped do just that on Saturday, April 5, at Wildwood Picnic Area.

pair of volunteers

The Angeles National Forest provides the Los Angeles region with 33 percent of its water, with the Big Tujunga Watershed as the largest local source of water for the City of Los Angeles. The critical role this area provides to the region’s water supply is one of the reasons the NFF focused efforts on the Angeles as a Treasured Landscape . After the devastating Station Fire scorched 252 square miles, including 90 percent of the Big Tujunga Watershed, the NFF recognized the need for large-scale restoration.

volunteer

Coca-Cola employees came out to support the restoration of this natural resource by removing invasive weeds that steal water from the ecosystem and reduce native habitat for birds and butterflies. The work of the employees is the culmination of a partnership between Coca-Cola, the U.S. Forest Service, and the NFF that removed invasive weeds from 200 acres in the Big Tujunga canyon and replenished 2.4 million liters of water back to nature.

pair of volunteers

This effort is part of the NFF’s program to restore the headwaters of National Forests across the country. The NFF significantly leveraged the contribution from Coca-Cola to accomplish this important conservation project on the ground. Of course Smokey Bear, the spectacular weather, support from Coca-Cola and the US Forest Service, all helped make this a fantastic day up in Los Angeles Backyard Forest.

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Comments on Coca-Cola Volunteers Remove Invasive Species on Angeles National Forest

April 26 2014 10:10 PM | HyltonHiker said…

Awsome job guys and gals another reason I drink Coca-Cola

April 12 2014 1:01 PM | Ross S. Heckmann said…

This is great. How does one go about getting the knowledge and training for removing invasive weeds from public lands? Are their groups dedicated to this? (Personally I live in Arcadia, only a short drive away from the Angeles National Forest.) I have my hands full right now but this is something that weighs heavily on me and I hope to be able to do something about it some day.

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