National Forest Foundation

Green Mountain National Forest: A Weeks Act Profile

The National Forest System

scroll

Around this time each fall, “leaf peepers” flock to the woods of Vermont to enjoy the rustle of the dry leaves, frost-tinged mornings and the wash of gold, red and orange that covers the hills and mountainsides. And all of the ruckus is for good reason: there really is nothing like Vermont in during peak foliage season.

Located within a day’s drive for more than 70 million Americans and boasting more than 400,000 acres of prime leaf peeping territory, Green Mountain National Forest highlights some of the best fall color around. Hike rugged mountains, take a stroll along gently rolling hills and visit quaint country hamlets, all while marveling at the brilliant colors spreading across the landscape around you. Not only does the forest stretch nearly two-thirds of the length of the state, but it also is home to 900 miles of trail, including portions of three nationally designated trails: The Appalachian National Scenic Trail, the Long National Recreation Trail and the Robert Frost National Recreation Trail.

Located within a day’s drive for more than 70 million Americans and boasting more than 400,000 acres of prime leaf peeping territory, Green Mountain National Forest highlights some of the best fall color around. Hike rugged mountains, take a stroll along gently rolling hills and visit quaint country hamlets, all while marveling at the brilliant colors spreading across the landscape around you. Not only does the forest stretch nearly two-thirds of the length of the state, but it also is home to 900 miles of trail, including portions of three nationally designated trails: The Appalachian National Scenic Trail, the Long National Recreation Trail and the Robert Frost National Recreation Trail.

After more than a century of damage from unregulated logging, the Green Mountain National Forest was established in 1932 under the Weeks Act. Today the landscape has recovered greatly, and the forest has more to show for it than just the impressive showings of fall color. The woods are alive with animals big and small, and the streams and rivers are known for their fine trout fishing, especially around the Middlebury area.

It’s hard to stray far from history during your visit to the Green Mountain. With more than 2,000 archeological sites on the forest that range from Native American villages to colonial farmsteads, you’re bound to come across some piece of the past! Looking for a unique cycling experience? On the Green Mountain National Forest you can take your bike out for a spin on what were once 19th century carriage routes!

If you can’t make it to the forest until later in the year, the Green Mountain still has a wealth of adventures awaiting you. Route 7, which runs the length of the state is dotted with ski areas; the forest is known for its three alpine and seven Nordic destinations. Snowshoeing and snowmobiling are also ever-popular winter recreation options. The snow-covered hills and dales are just as charming. Just pick your favorite season and get outside!


Related Posts

Ten "Best Of" National Forests

Although each National Forest features its own unique attractions, there are a select few that stand out as superlatives in a variety of categories. Whatever your interest, there is a forest for you full of unforgettable experiences. This list represents the best of the best from states throughout the country.

Read more

U.S. Forest Service Reaches Urban Audience with ‘Urban Connections’

In 2000, the Eastern Region of the U.S. Forest Service began laying the groundwork for Urban Connections (UC), an outreach effort that fosters mutual relationships to connect urban residents and the Forest Service through the conservation and enjoyment of forests and green spaces in the country’s largest metropolitan areas.

Read more

Share this post on social media

Comments

Like this content?

If you enjoy this article and find it useful, support the NFF to ensure we can continue helping you and others discover our National Forests.

Donate Now