National Forest Foundation

Learning Topics

Landscape Restoration Approaches & Tools

Restoring ecosystems at a landscape scale and across all lands - federal, state, tribal, and private - is an important goal for many collaborative groups. Landscape restoration projects are often designed to address a variety of issues, such as wildfire threats in the wildland-urban interface, climate change, insects and disease, and other forest health and watershed risks. Through initiatives such as the Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Program, Chief's Joint Landscape Restoration Partnership, Stewardship End Result Contracting, and large-scale NEPA analysis, the Forest Service and collaborative partners are working together to move forward at a larger scale. The peer learning sessions, tools, and resources below were developed to support and encourage landscape restoration.

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Tools

Selected Peer Learning Sessions

Innovative Approaches to the National Environmental Policy Act (May 14, 2014)
In this peer learning session, participants heard about three innovative approaches to NEPA: (1) Adaptive NEPA on the Pike and San Isabel National Forests, (2) Mountain Pine Beetle Response on the Black Hills, and (3) National Forest A to Z Mill Creek Stewardship Project on the Colville National Forest.

Restoring Forests & Communities: Lessons from CFLRP (May 7, 2014)
What can we learn from the experiences of the existing Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration (CFLR) projects? That is the overarching question that a group of five graduate students at the University of Michigan School of Natural Resources and Environment sought to answer through an interdisciplinary analysis of the "second cohort" of thirteen CFLR projects designated in 2012. The National Forest Foundation helped guide the research team over the past year, and were pleased to share the findings in a peer learning session.

Innovative Approaches to the National Environmental Policy Act (May 14, 2014)
Questions of efficiency, scale, and timeline for the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process are common to landscape restoration projects across the country. The Forest Service and its community partners are striving to find better ways to meet the challenge of limited resources and respond to changing conditions on the ground within the NEPA framework in order to achieve restoration results.

Multiparty Monitoring and Stewardship Contracting
Multiparty Monitoring and Stewardship Contracting: A Tool for Adaptive Management is the last in a series of three guidebooks produced by Sustainable Northwest. The purpose of this guidebook is to help readers understand the steps necessary to developing a monitoring program; to identify questions that need to be addressed before beginning a monitoring program; and to provide examples that may be useful for reference.

Selected Tools & Resources

Multiparty Monitoring & Assessment Guidelines
With support from the Forest Service Collaborative Forest Restoration Program and the Ford Foundation, the National Forest Foundation (NFF) facilitated a diverse effort to develop a series of handbooks on multiparty monitoring, written by the Northern Arizona University Ecological Restoration Institute. These handbooks provide guidance in getting started, bringing stakeholders to the table, putting together the monitoring plan, and identifying ecological, social, and economic indicators.

Evaluation and Adaptation in Collaborative Resource Management – A New Sourcebook (Sourcebook PDF)
The sourcebook was developed by Ann Moote in coordination with a project team of the following organizations: Ecological Restoration Institute, Forest Guild, National Forest Foundation, USFS Ecosystem Services and National Partnership Office, Watershed Research and Training Center, and Sustainable Northwest.

Restoring Forests & Communities: Lessons from CFLRP - Final Report
What can we learn from the experiences of the existing Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration (CFLR) projects? That is the overarching question that a group of five graduate students at the University of Michigan School of Natural Resources and Environment sought to answer through an interdisciplinary analysis of the "second cohort" of thirteen CFLR projects designated in 2012. The companion to this final report is a peer learning session with the same title.


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