National Forest Foundation

NFF leads way with Sequoia Work Group

Collaboration

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Giant sequoias ( Sequoiadendron giganteum ) are an iconic feature of Sierra Nevadan forests and one of the largest living things on earth.

This week, the NFF-lead Sequoia working group was featured on BBC radio. Listen to the story here.

Sequoias have featured prominently in the development of the environmental movement with John Muir writing about them in an awestruck manner:

“Do behold the King in his glory, King Sequoia. Behold! Behold! Seems all I can say.”

Giant sequoias are found from Sequoia National Forest to Tahoe National forest on public and private lands. Old growth sequoia groves were threatened for years by over harvest but more recently are threatened by lack of fire and drought conditions.

Staff from various agencies and non-profits have met recently to discuss ways their organizations can collaborate to improve the management of sequoias particularly in the face of climate change. Collaboration with local communities to increase support of management practices and connect locals with the forests and groves will be a sought after objective.


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