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Green Mountain National Forest

The Green Mountain National Forest is located in southwestern and central Vermont. This Forest is a four season recreation experience. The most popular season is autumn when the mountains are ablaze with color.

The Forest's diverse landscapes range from the rugged, exposed heights of the Green Mountains to the quiet, secluded hollows in the Wilderness. The Forest is within a day’s drive of 70 million people.

Today, the nearly 400,000-acre Green Mountain National Forest contains more than 2000 archaeological and historic sites spanning the history of Vermont. Of interest are Native American sites, the remains of colonial-era subsistence farmsteads, and evidence of the technologies of the industrial period. Other sites include the roads, structures and facilities built by the Civilian Conservation Corps in the 1930's.

The Forest's scenic beauty along the backbone of Vermont's Green Mountains offers unlimited recreation opportunities any season of the year.

Of particular interest to many are the auto foliage tours. And one of the most sought-after sights within the Green Mountain National Forest is the majestic moose. Click here to learn more about moose, and the best places to spot one.

Whether you enjoy hiking, skiing, mountain biking, camping, fishing or hunting, the Green Mountain National Forest can provide the recreational experience you are seeking! Primitive recreational opportunities exist within the six Wilderness Areason the Green Mountain National Forest.

Encompassing a boundary area of approximately 821,000 acres, roughly 385,000 (or 62%) is federally owned. Green Mountain is one of the few Forests that required, and still requires, the purchase of privately-owned land.

Over the past five decades, Forest Service personnel have worked hard to acquire a land base on which to practice modern forest management, thus providing the state of Vermont and the New England area with wood for local industries; natural recreation areas; a vibrant watershed for local tributaries; game and fish management; and protection of unique ecological and wilderness areas.

Vermont Forests

First-timer’s Adventure

The Rattlesnake Cliffs and Aunt Jenny Trail hike is a moderate 3.2-mile round-trip excursion to a waterfall and scenic views.

After climbing for about one mile, the trail passes the upper end of the Aunt Jenny Trail, then forks at the Oak Ridge Trail. Another fork to the left leads to the dramatic South Rattlesnake Cliff with a view of Silver Lake and Lake Dunmore. The right fork leads to a smaller set of cliffs with views west to Lake Dunmore and the Adirondack Mountains.

From March to August in some years, the trail to the cliffs is closed to protect Peregrine Falcons. Call ahead for information.

Statistics

State(s):

Vermont

Nearest Large Urban Area:

Albany, NY

Notes & Conditions:

Before heading out on a fishing or hunting expedition, make sure you check regulations with the Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department.

Research campground locations and amenities at the U.S. National Forest Campground Directory. The Web site is full of pictures and detailed descriptions to help you plan your next trip.

If you want to experience a guided recreation trip in a National Forest, visit Adventure Vacation to learn about whitewater rafting, canoeing, kayaking, horseback riding, camping, hiking and fishing trips.

Maps:

Visit the National Forest Store to see what maps are available for this Forest and others you may want to visit.