National Forest Foundation

Requests for Proposals

Request for Proposal: Bill Williams Mountain Steep Slope 2 Thinning, Kaibab National Forest, Arizona

Summary Overview
The Bill Williams Mountain Restoration Project is a multi-facetted effort encompassing a variety of forest health and fuels reduction activities planned across a 15,200-acre landscape. Located 4 miles from Williams, Arizona, the mountain creates the primary watershed and municipal water supply for the city. It provides a variety of unique plant and animal habitats, serves as an important recreation hub, and houses critical communications infrastructure perched atop its 9,170 foot tall peak.

Potential damages from a catastrophic wildfire occurring on the mountain and subsequent post-fire flooding within its watershed would devastate the mountain’s ecology as well as local infrastructure, water supplies and wreak additional downstream damages. Studies have conservatively estimated the costs of potential damages to be well over $400 million.

Following EIS approval in December 2015, work began “to improve the health and sustainability of forested conditions on and surrounding Bill Williams Mountain by reducing hazardous fuels and moving vegetative conditions in the project area toward the desired conditions.” Treatments on the mountain have included prescribed fire, hand-thinning, traditional ground based logging and specialized steep slope helicopter logging.

Last year in 2020, the project’s first mechanized steep slope operation was completed with 300 acres of thinning and fuels removal implemented utilizing helicopter yarding. This and future projects in subsequent years will continue to address the critical need to treat roughly 1,200 acres of high priority steep slope acres on the mountain and compliment both the ecological and fire/flood risk reduction benefits of the many other forest restoration and fuels reduction efforts occurring on and around Bill Williams Mountain.

Deadline:
Responses should be emailed by Friday, June 4, 2021.

Contact:
Mark Brehl at mbrehl@nationalforests.org or 928.853.7578