Requests for Proposals

Request for Proposal: Little Green Valley Fen Fencing and Spring Construction, Tonto National Forest, Arizona

Summary Overview
Fens are peat-forming wetlands that rely on groundwater input and require thousands of years to develop, and cannot easily be restored or replaced once destroyed. In Arizona, fens are an especially unique wetland type, home to rare plants, native wildlife, and important in groundwater discharge function and processes in the watershed.

Little Green Valley is one of the largest fens in Arizona, draining into the Salt River Watershed. A 20 foot deep head cut has been migrating upstream for many years. Comparison of 1946 and 1988 aerial photos revealed that the head cut had migrated upstream approximately 750 feet between those years. While the original head cut is no longer advancing into the fen, a 1200 foot-long, 10 foot deep and up to 20 feet wide gully persists. This gully has lowered the groundwater table such that the fen is now dry. It has also caused downstream water quality issues. This project will reduce sedimentation and increase groundwater levels in the fen, restoring its aquatic habitat and promoting hydrologic function.

Phase I of the project consists of constructing 1 portion of new fence (~5,400 linear feet), enclosing approximately 18 acres. When completed to specifications, the fence will remain in place for a minimum of 20 years and be a sturdy barrier that will prevent elk and cattle from damaging riparian vegetation and soil. The new fence will be constructed on the side of a mountain and will require installation on a slope. All old and unused materials will be removed from the fen and neatly stored at an approved location (See Map, Appendix A). A spring located within the fen will be developed with a spring box and pipeline leading to a trough outside of the fenced area.

Deadline:
Bids should be emailed by Tuesday, September 7, 2021.

Contact:
Sasha Stortz at sstortz@nationalforests.org

Request for Proposal: Granite Basin Forest Health Improvement Project, Prescott National Forest, Arizona

Summary Overview
The Granite Basin Recreation Area on the Prescott National Forest provides a variety of year-round recreational activities for visitors including hiking, backpacking, horseback riding, non-motorized boating, fishing, rock climbing, camping, and picnicking. Like much of the west, past management practices and fire exclusion have altered the forest structure, function, and natural processes on this site, resulting in increased fuel loading and undesirable tree encroachment into important riparian ecosystems. Current conditions pose an elevated risk of unnaturally high severity wildfire and threaten the sustainability and ecological integrity of the riparian systems.

Watershed conditions on the Prescott National Forest (PNF) have been degraded and altered over the last century as a result of natural and anthropogenic causes. This has enabled high fuel loadings and severe fire risks which are well outside of historic conditions and pose a significant threat to the watersheds that feed the Verde River. The USDA Forest Service has the mission “to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of the Nation’s forests and grasslands to meet the needs of present and future generations.” Restoration is critical to reduce fuel loading across the Forest and allow for the reintroduction of low-intensity, beneficial fire to the landscape to maintain healthy watersheds and reduce the risk of catastrophic wildfire behavior. The objective of Phase 1 is to treat and monitor hazardous fuels to improve priority landscapes within the Prescott National Forest.

The National Forest Foundation and the Prescott National Forest have partnered to advance the USDA Forest Service mission to “sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of the Nation’s forests and Grasslands to meet the needs of present and future generations,” through implementation of the Granite Basin Forest Health Project removing unnaturally dense vegetation contributing to wildfire risk and riparian degradation.

Deadline:
Responses should be emailed by Friday, September 17, 2021.

Contact:
Mark Brehl at mbrehl@nationalforests.org

Request for Proposal: Flying V&H Shaded Fuel Break Project, Tonto National Forest, Arizona

Summary Overview
The National Forest Foundation (NFF) has partnered with the Tonto National Forest, AZ Game and Fish Department, and Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation to implement forest fuel reduction activities on the Pleasant Valley District of the Tonto National Forest, southeast of Young, Arizona.

As the first phase of larger landscape scale efforts, the 1,753-acre Flying VH Shaded Fuel Break project is designed to restore natural forest structure, reduce the risk of high severity wildfire, protect or enhance wildlife habitat, and improve watershed health. Treatment will contribute to the subsequent safe reintroduction of prescribed fire across more than 57,000 acres (Rim Country EIS and Flying V&H CE) near the communities of Young and Pleasant Valley and the adjacent Fort Apache Indian Reservation.

Treatment objectives include mechanical mastication of juniper, evergreen oak trees and woody brush species to 1. Create a structure that more closely resembles the structure that existed prior to interruption of the historic fire regime (open juniper woodland, large diameter junipers and oaks arranged in “groups”, decreased shrub cover, abundance of native grasses); 2. Maintain ponderosa pine, pinyon pine, and Arizona white oak; 3. Reduce the risk of catastrophic, stand-replacing wildfire by decreasing tree densities, ladder fuels, and crown continuity.

The project is offered in three phases to treat 1,753 acres of overgrown juniper woodlands. Work includes up to 1571 acres of mastication and 182 acres of hand thinning within archeological sites. Areas that cannot be masticated shall be thinned by hand.

    Deadline:
    Responses should be emailed by by September 10, 2021.

    Contact:
    Mark Brehl at mbrehl@nationalforests.org

    Request for Proposal: Border III - Sierra Vista Ranger District Woody Brush/Tree Mastication, Coronado National Forest, Arizona

    Summary Overview

    The National Forest Foundation (NFF), the Forest Service, and local community partners are working together to improve watershed conditions and wildlife habitat on the Coronado National Forest that have been degraded by natural and anthropogenic causes. Restoration is imperative to maintain a healthy watershed and provide appropriate habitat for wildlife. Across this landscape, fuels have accumulated and have the potential to contribute to uncharacteristic fire behavior. One priority project in this larger landscape involves forest restoration treatments on the Sierra Vista Ranger District, located in Cochise County.

    The purpose of this Request for Proposal (RFP) is to engage professional forestry contractors to provide bids for mastication treatment occurring in the Border 3 Project area (see Appendix A). The project covers approximately 931 acres. Proposals should include a total price per acre; for example, mobilization, mechanical equipment, direct and indirect labor, should be already included in your unit price. A Quality Control Plan is to be submitted with quotation. If the price exceeds the available budget, NFF may request work to be done on some but not all of the requested acres.

    Deadline:
    Responses should be emailed by Friday, September 10, 2021.

    Contact:
    Mark Brehl at mbrehl@nationalforests.org.