National Forest Foundation

Our Forests

Find a Forest

Uinta National Forest

The unique mix of stunning geography, people and events have made the Uinta National Forest in Utah the incredible place it is today and will continue to carry it into the future.

Like all National Forests in Utah, the Uinta was created at the request of local communities. Although early European-American settlers tried to use the land wisely, they did not fully understand the basic facts of ecology as we understand them today. By the 1890's, many of the range, timber and watershed resources of the Uinta and Wasatch Mountains were seriously depleted. The newly created Forest Service was seen as the best organization to turn this around. Its mission was to manage these public lands for the best use by the largest number of people.

This goal continues today, with the addition of greater knowledge about how ecosystems function. This means managing resources under the best combination of uses to benefit the American people while ensuring the long term health of all parts of the ecosystem.

Get out and play
The Uinta National Forest has some of the best campgrounds in the state. Many sites can be reserved through ReserveUSA.com, while many are available on a "first come, first served" basis. Or check out this for more information.

Hiking and camping provide exercise and interest for people of any age. Just getting out and walking around is a wonderful way to see nature. Since unexpected things happen the best way to help guarantee a good time for all is to plan ahead carefully and follow safety precautions.

The Uinta National Forest offers spectacular mountain biking opportunities, catering to all levels of skill. But we are most proud of some of the best singletrack in the state!

If you visit in winter, there are numerous opportunities for snowshoeing and cross-country skiing.

If power is your thing, there are plenty of opportunities for motorized recreation on the forest, but be sure to check special regulations before you head out. Riding in unauthorized places is not only damaging to the forest, but also illegal.

For those interested in solitude and pristine places, plan a trip to one of the forest's three wilderness areas, which include theLone Peak wilderness just south of Salt Lake City, the stunning Mount Timpanogos wilderness and the Mount Nebo wildernesswith the majestic 11,877-foot Mount Nebo.

Utah Forests

First-timer’s Adventure

Take a hike

The Currant Creek Trail is an easy hike with panoramic views of Currant Creek Reservoir, red ledges and the Currant Creek Valley. After hiking just 1/8th of a mile the trail splits into a loop. The trail can be hiked in either direction but the right fork is steeper. There are two view points along the trail. Both have benches to rest on while enjoying the scenery. Aspen and wildflowers are scattered all along the route of this quick, scenic hike; perfect for the camper or casual hiker.

To get there: At the Currant Creek Campground, take loop D. The trailhead is just beyond campsite 2. Parking is available at the trailhead.

Statistics

State(s):

Utah

Nearest large Urban Area:

Salt Lake City

Notes & Conditions:

Research campground locations and amenities at the U.S. National Forest Campground Directory. The Web site is full of pictures and detailed descriptions to help you plan your next trip.

If you want to experience a guided recreation trip in a National Forest, visit Adventure Vacation to learn about whitewater rafting, canoeing, kayaking, horseback riding, camping, hiking and fishing trips.

Maps:

Visit the National Forest Store to see what maps are available for this Forest and others you may want to visit.