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Deschutes National Forest

Nestled along the Cascade Mountains, the Deschutes National Forest is one of the most popular recreation forests in the Pacific Northwest. Truly a four season vacationland, the Forest attracts more than 8 million people every year to camp, fish, hike, hunt, ski, and enjoy a multitude of outdoor activities.

Since their creation as parts of the Cascade Forest Reserve in1893 and Blue Mountains Forest Reserve 1906, the Deschutes and nearby Ochoco National Forests have played an important role in Central Oregon's economic and social history. They were major suppliers of timber during the decades when mills formed the core of Central Oregon's economy and today are a destination for the millions of people who visit Central Oregon each year.

Recreation is an important part of the Deschutes National Forest, and the reason why most visitors come here. Even if you come to boat, hike, ski or climb, chances are pretty good that you'll be camping as well. There are more than 125 developed and listed campgrounds on the Deschutes and Ochoco National Forests, ranging from small primitive campgrounds with a few campsites to large well developed campgrounds with more than a 100 campsites. And there are many more in the backcountry for those looking for a wilder adventure.

Photo by Ken Homan

Fishing is another popular activity in central Oregon. There are numerous lakes and rivers full of trout and numerous other species. Learn more at the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Web site.

First-timer’s Adventure

Visit a volcano!
The Deschutes National Forest is a geologically young and complex volcanic region on the east flank of the Cascade Range and on the large shield shaped volcano, Newberry. The great variety of volcanic and glacial landforms found here are probably unique in the United States. Large strato or composite volcanoes, many deeply eroded by glaciers, line the crest of the Cascades and hundreds of cinder cones dot the landscape.

Newberry National Volcanic National Monument includes 50,000 acres of lakes, lava flows, and spectacular geologic features in central Oregon. The highest point within the Monument is the summit Paulina Peak (7,985 ft.), showcasing views of the Oregon Cascades and across the High Desert. It's spectacular!

Statistics

State(s):

Oregon

Nearest Large Urban Area:

Bend

Notes & Conditions:

Learn about OHV use in central Oregon by visiiting the Forest Service's OHV page.

Maps:

Visit the National Forest Store to see what maps are available for this Forest and others you may want to visit.